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Chess genius Kasparov shares insight on AI and supply chain

The world’s best-known chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov will be among the keynote speakers at an online supply chain event being held on November 10. 

Called Fireside Summit: Grandmasters of Supply Chain and Manufacturing, the event will focus on the role artificial intelligence (AI) has to play in supply chain resilience. 

Among the other speakers are Vageesh Mehrotra, VP, customer, planning and network strategies at Kellogg; Tim Nall, CIO of wine and spirits company, Brown-Forman; Memia Fendri Chekir, project specialist, advanced manufacturing at the World Economic Forum; and Infosys Consulting’s global head of retail and logistics, Andrew Hogenson.

Supply Chain AI in the spotlight 

The webinar is being hosted by Noodle.ai, a US-based AI company whose technology aids the frictionless flow of goods, from raw materials to shelf.

Azerbiajan-born chess genius Kasparov first hit the headlines in the mid-1980s, with a series of epic World Chess Championship clashes against Antoly Karpov. Yet it is probably Kasparov’s defeats against the IBM super-computer, DeepBlue, for which he is best known.

It was after his second loss to DeepBlue in 1997 that Kasparov realized the huge potential that lay in partnering with AI, instead of competing with it. This led to his formulation of an equation to represent human-machine relations, which came to be known as Kasparov’s Law. This states that: weak-human-plus machine-plus-better-process is superior to strong-human-plus-machine-plus-inferior-process.

Kasparov – who prefers to call AI ‘augmented intelligence’ – went on to become AI’s leading evangelist, working with Oxford University and Google among others, to promote AI’s benefits to humanity.   

Supply chain pandemic lessons 

During the ‘Fireside Chat’, Kasparov will share his thoughts on the power of human and machine intelligence. The other speakers will focus on the AI supply chain lessons they learned during the pandemic, and how this will help them prepare for the challenges that lie ahead in 2022.

The event is one of a series that Noodle.ai is holding in conjunction with Kasparov. Noodle.ai CEO Stephen Pratt said the events are designed to showcase real-world applications of AI, and how it can “augment human capacity to ask questions, to find answers that help workers, companies, and the environment”.

Kasparov said: “What interested me so much when I heard about Noodle.ai is the principle of using these incredible AI tools to solve problems that are damaging our quality of life, not just damaging the bottom line of our businesses. This is the positive future for AI, and of the human-machine relationship. It is a future of data crunching and pattern-finding by machines. It is a future of creativity and strategic leadership by us human beings. That is the future.”

He added: “With augmented intelligence, we harness both the computing power of machines and the power of human creativity to drive greater results and to free humans to do the creative labor at which we excel. 

AI tech ‘a mirror reflecting humans’

“How can we get the most not just from AI, but also from the rapidly increasing number of people who work with it? That is the key: how to centre people in the equation. Otherwise, we will fail at the one thing only humans can do: to set priorities to know what matters most.

“AI is not independent of us. Like all technologies throughout history, AI is neither good nor evil. Think of AI as a mirror, reflecting its creators – us. And since we cannot take our needs and biases out, we have to look at the big picture from the very start to make sure we’re moving in the right direction.”

As well as having access to the keynotes, registrants will be able to view on-demand recordings after the event.

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